Recent Donations to the Friends

The Friends of the Yeatman Hospital would like thank the following local groups that have supported our work to the benefit of all our patients. Each of these groups have used their time and talents in unique and innovative ways. Do you belong to a group that could raise much needed funds for your local hospital? Please get in touch with the Friend’s Administrator on admin@friendsoftheyeatman.org.uk to discuss your ideas.

Communifit January 5K Run

Waking up to a heavy frost, over 130 runners/walkers of all ages met at the Terraces to take part in the Communist first 5K run in 2020. Young and old alike braved the cold to help support the Friends of the Yeatman Hospital. Chairman David Hayes welcomed all before running himself. All participants received a snowflake medal for finishing.

West End Short Matt Bowls Teams

John Tuffin, Chairman of the West End Short Mat Bowls team, presented a cheque for £126 to Friends’ Chairman, David Hayes. This sum was raised by the 47 members donating money they would have spent sending each other Christmas cards.

Felting, Fibres and Friendship Group

Carla Taylor, local artist, and the Felting, Fibres and Friendship Group lovely crafted a variety of decorations they sold in the Old School Galley in Yetminister over the Christmas period. Their handiwork raised £30 for the Friends.

The Keeper’s Wife – December 1st Sherborne Festive Shopping Day

Rachel Sprake, founder of The Keeper’s Wife, and her family raised £250 for the Friends during the Sherborne Festive shopping Day in the new Digby Hall. They refreshed visitors with a selection of baked goods and tea/coffee in relaxed surroundings.

Greenslade Taylor Hunt – December 1st Sherborne Festive Shopping Day

Richard Stubbert and the team of Greenslade Taylor Hunt welcomed the Friends at their stall at the top of Cheap Street. They provided a fantastic hamper for us to raffle, Lucky Dip, and endless energy. We not only raised one £900 but awareness of the Yeatman and how the Friends support our patients. Mary Kathcell keen craftswomen also sold her handiwork.